Thursday, August 26, 2010

Thoughts on Prejudice from Edmund Burke

For, in Webster's, there are several definitions of "prejudice."

The most pejorative one is "an irrational attitude of hostility directed against an individual, a group, a race." Another definition, however, is simply a "preconceived judgment or opinion."

It is this idea of prejudice that Edmund Burke endorsed:

"Many of our men of speculation, instead of exploding general prejudices, employ their sagacity to discover the latent wisdom which prevails in them. If they find what they seek, and they seldom fail, they think it most wise to continue the prejudice, with the reason involved, than to cast away the coat of prejudice, and to leave nothing but the naked reason."

"Naked reason," pure rationalism, permeates the Post editorial, which ignores that vast realm of sentiments, such as patriotism and love, that reside in the terrain between thought and feeling.

"The heart has reasons that the mind knows not," said Pascal.

True conservatives are people of the heart who use the weapons of the mind to defend the things of the heart.

Quotation from online column by Patrick Buchanan on August 26, 2010 on

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